DISCOVER

Every movement begins with a moment.

Inside The Matrix

Posted 7 January 2015 10:00 AM by John Rich/Jerry Hudson — Moxie Future Experiences

We found ourselves on a ledge 40 stories up, and one step forward was certain death. Then we remembered we were in a 9-by-9-foot padded room in the South Hall at CES. The ability to forget where your body actually is might be one of the most impressive parts of the Oculus Rift Crescent Bay demo. Oculus gets the lion’s share of virtual reality (VR) media coverage, but the sign that VR is about to reach the general consumer is the wide range of vendors and VR solutions that are about to enter the market. From the super simple and cheap — but still engaging — Google cardboard to Samsung’s phone-powered Gear VR to the Razer OSVR initiative, which is trying to create an open source VR software platform that will unify and accelerate VR development for hardware, software and content developers. All together this is looking like it will (finally) be the year of VR.

On a similar note, augmented reality (AR) had a strong showing with these three new smart glasses:



ODG Smart Glasses — High definition mobile computing in a five-ounce wayfarer style frame.


Sony SmartEyeglassAttach — What’s different here is that this clip-on unit can make any pair of glasses into smart glasses.


Atheer Gesture-Controlled AiR™Smart Glasses – Although designed for more commercial and industrial uses, the integrated gesture-based functionality may soon find its way into consumer smart glasses.

Once again, the range of solutions points to the vitality of the AR space, and where it lags VR in consumer interest, it more than makes up for it with commercial and industrial adoption. All together these decades-in-the-making, almost-magical technologies are about to transform the way we both work and play.

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